Boy Meets Girl, The End

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Please be advised that the book Boy Meets Girl, The End
contains the following elements deemed inappropriate
for people of all ages:
*Adult Themes*
*Foul Language*
*Gratuitous Violence*
*Strong Sexual Content*
*Illicit Innuendos*
*Graphic Nudity*
*Dark Humor*
*Drug Usage*
*Mind Games*
*Emotional Hostilities*
*Mischief and Mayhem*
*Melodramatic Absurdism*
*Involuntary Outbursts of Wild Speculation*
and *Fictionalized Truths from Real Life Caricatures*

We are not responsible for the occurrence of any
*Bruised Feelings*
*Deflated Egos*
*Role Reversals*
*Moral Upheavals*
*Relation-ship Wrecks*
*Out of The Box In-sights*
or *Automatic Trans-gressions*
that may result from
the reading or sharing of the material
contained within this book
(and/or yourselves)

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The Management at Zenahora

Summary

Cecil is your typical happy-go-lucky guy, content with his life just the way that it is – and why shouldn’t he be? He’s got everything he could possibly want: a good job and his own place in the city, a boisterous group of friends he’s known since kindergarten, and a hot-blooded girlfriend that always keeps him on his toes. As far as he’s concerned, life is perfect, and he wouldn’t change a thing.

Angela is your typical planning-for-her-future girl, ready for the life she knows is coming her way – and why shouldn’t she be? She’ll have everything she’s always wished for: a lovely home, a couple of beautiful children, and a loving and supportive husband that shares her dreams and passions. As far as she’s concerned, life will be perfect – if only she can get Cecil to understand that he’s going to have to change a few things about himself in the meantime.

Linda isn’t your typical woman (or typical person for that matter), and would probably give you an earful for using the word “typical” and her name in the same sentence. She needs even more freedom in her life than guys like Cecil, and is two steps ahead of women like Angela on a slow day. Men (and women) adore her, and she’s got more than enough love for the whole world combined – so why isn’t she satisfied with her life? Seems like she still has a few more things to figure out – and Cecil just might be one of them.

Boy Meets Girl, The End is a modern-day fable that takes on the challenge of the age-old paradox, “What happens when an unstoppable force meets an immovable object?” – or in this case, what happens when a woman whose biological clock is ticking falls for a man who’s just looking for a good time?


Influences

Blindness José Saramago / Fernando Meirelles

“The city afflicted by the blindness is never named, nor the country specified. Few definite identifiers of culture are given, which contributes an element of timelessness and universality to the novel.”

“Saramago originally refused to sell the rights for a film adaptation, but the producers were able to acquire it with the condition that the film would be set in an unnamed and unrecognizable city.”

Revolutionary Road Richard Yates / Sam Mendes

“When DeWitt Henry and Geoffrey Clark interviewed Yates for the Winter, 1972 issue of Ploughshares, Yates detailed the title’s subtext: “I think I meant it more as an indictment of American life in the 1950s. Because during the Fifties there was a general lust for conformity all over this country, by no means only in the suburbs — a kind of blind, desperate clinging to safety and security at any price.”

Fight Club Chuck Palahniuk / David Fincher

“Maryville University of St. Louis professor Jesse Kavadlo, in an issue of the literary journal Stirrings Still, claimed that the narrator’s opposition to emasculation is a form of projection and that the problem that he fights is himself. He also claims that Palahniuk uses existentialism in the novel to conceal subtexts of feminism and romance in order to convey these concepts in a novel that is mainly aimed at a male audience.

Palahniuk gives a simpler assertion about the theme of the novel, stating “all my books are about a lonely person looking for some way to connect with other people.”

~ Behind The Curtain ~